Showing posts with label play puzzle game. Show all posts

Friday, August 21, 2015

Switching Logic

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bulbs logic game
You are in a basement. In front of you are three light switches, all in their OFF state. These switches are connected to three lightbulbs that are on a wall in the attic, so there's no chance you can see them unless you climb the stairs all the way up. There is a 1-to-1 mapping between the switches and the bulbs.

You are given plenty of time to play around with the switches in the basement, where you can put each individual switch in either its ON or OFF state.

However, you can only go upstairs once to check on the state of the bulbs!

Once you've gone upstairs and checked on the bulbs, you must be able to tell with 100% certainty which bulb is connected to which switch, without having to go down again.

How can you tell which switch is connected to each bulb?

 

Notes:
  • You can't put a switch halfway between ON and OFF, hoping that this would make the bulb flicker like a bad neon light...
  • You can't control the switches from a distance, eg with a string or whatever other form of remote control.
  • You can't have anyone cooperating with you on the other floor, and that includes your dog who knows how to bark once for a 'yes' and twice for a 'no'.

Switching Logic Puzzle Solution

Turn switch #1 ON. After about five minutes or so, turn switch #1 OFF and turn switch #2 ON.
Then go upstairs and check on the bulbs.

The one ON is obviously #2. The other ones are OFF, but one of them should be very hot by having been ON for five minutes. That's #1, and the remaining bulb is #3.

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Which Chest Is Which

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merlin and arthur riddle

One day Arthur came to Merlin and asked him, "Show me how to be a wise and good king." Merlin replied, "If you can pass a series of mental tests, I will teach you".

Merlin then showed Arthur three chests, one was labelled GOLD COINS, the second was labelled SILVER COINS, and the last, GOLD OR SILVER COINS. He stated that all the three labels were all on the wrong chests. Given that one chest contained gold, one silver, and one bronze.

How many chests must Arthur open to deduce which label goes on which chest?

Which Chest Is Which Puzzle Solution

Arthur does not need to open any chests.

Since all labels are on the wrong chests, the chest labelled GOLD OR SILVER COINS cannot contain either gold nor silver, so must contain bronze. Thus the chest labelled GOLD COINS must contain silver coins, and SILVER COINS must contain gold.

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Loadsa Coins!

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conis logical game
Laid out neatly in front of you as far as you can see are coins, coins and more coins. "That's a lot of coins," you think to yourself.

Greed sidles up to you and whispers, "Actually, there are an infinite number. And it can all be yours!"

Upon seeing your raised eyebrow, he continues. "The rules are simple. 20 of the coins are heads, the rest are tails. All you have to do is split all the coins into just two groups so that the number of heads is the same in both groups."

Seeing the obvious difficulties, you begin to protest. "But..."

"You can turn over as many coins as you like," he interrupts. "And the groups do not have to have the same number of coins in them."

"Oh ok. Can I start now?"

"Sure, you have one day to complete this task. You can start as soon as I blind you for one day."
"How can I get through it all in a day...! What do you mean blind me...!?"

Although you cannot see him, you are quite certain that he is grinning.

You cannot see. You cannot feel the difference between head nor tail. How can you accomplish this task with certainty in a single day?

Loadsa Coins! Puzzle Solution

You reach out and pick any 20 coins, and turn each of them over. The 20 coins is one group, and the remaining coins the other.

"Bugger," says Greed. "Why didn't I think of that?"

"It's so simple, yet so difficult to think of," you say. "Now can I have my eyesight back? Hello? Hello......!?"

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

The Package

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G answered his ringing mobile phone. "G here."

"It's H. Do you have the package?"

"Yes. I have the object, in its box."

"Very good," said H. "So send the box to me using the lock I gave you last time we met."

"I'm afraid I can't," said G hestitantly.

"Why not? The locking ring on the box is more than large enough to fit a lock on."

"I seem to have um, misplaced the lock."

"You what!" snarled H. "Do you have any other locks?"

"Yes, but you don't have the keys to them. We can't risk sending an unsecured box, nor an unsecured key. Sending an unlocked lock is out of the question, because they re-lock themselves automatically after a 2 minute timeout."

"Ah, all is not lost... I have an spare lock here... How much time do we have?"

"Plenty," replied G.

"Good. There is a way…
adaugi alt

How can they get the box and the object from G to H without any security risk?

 

Notes:
  • They can't meet in person -- that would render the puzzle pointless.
  • No, G can't go and look for the misplaced lock!
  • You cannot send a key by itself or in an unlocked box.

The Package Puzzle Solution

With the object in the box, G locks it with one of his own locks. He then sends the box to H. H attaches his own lock in addition to G's and then sends it back. G removes his lock and then sends it to H again.

Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Drama Galore!

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It was a beautiful day, perfect for a stroll. After leaving the cars at the edge of the woods, four couples moved towards the river, reaching its bank after a two-mile walk. The restaurant where they intended to dine was on the other side, partially hidden by trees.

But even on a perfectly planned day, evil could come and spoil it. During the stroll, Albert quietly told Amanda that she shouldn't have dressed quite so promiscuously, whilst she replied that he could have done a better job in refraining from making his oh-so-kind compliments to the other three girls. Bernard whispered menacing words at Barbara The Easy Flirt (as he called her then), and Barbara told him that his relationship with the other girls was of dubious morality. Simillar sorts of exchanges happened between Charles and Corinna, and between Douglas and, err, Diana. Reaching the river and seeing the flowing water did little to tame the souls. On the contrary, when the eight friends noticed that instead of the large boat that would carry them all over to the opposite bank, there was only a little boat that would carry no more than two persons at once, the irritation grew to the point that everybody started arguing with everybody else.

The river was about one hundred yards wide, with a small island in the middle. None of the four men were keen on leaving his girlfriend alone with one or more of his other male friends. On the other hand, the women found out that they could only agree on one point: none of their boyfriends should be alone on the boat when one of the girls, excluding his girlfriend, was all alone on any of the two banks or on the island.

Once the tempers calmed, Bernard and Douglas forumlated a plan involving many trips.

How many trips would it take to ferry everyone across whilst still adhering to the wishes of all the people?

 

Notes:
  • In case you haven't guessed, the couples are, Albert and Amanda, Bernard and Barbara, Charles and Corinna, and Douglas and Diana.
  • No woman should stay on one of the banks, on the island, or on the boat, in the company of one or more other men and without her boyfriend
  • No man should be alone on the boat when one of the girls, except his girlfriend, was all alone on one of the two banks or on the island

Drama Galore Puzzle Solution

They needed seventeen trips, frenquently using the island in the middle of the river as temporary destination. If we denote the names of the men with their initial in upper case, and the names of the women with their initial in lower case (by complete chance, the initials of the men are the same as the initials of their girlfriends), we would get the following table:
Trip # Departure bank Direction Island Direction Arrival bank
1 ABCDcd -
=>
ab
2 ABCDbcd
<=
- a
3 ABCDd
=>
bc a
4 ABCDcd
<=
b a
5 CDcd b
=>
ABa
6 BCDcd
<=
b Aa
7 BCD
=>
bcd Aa
8 BCDd
<=
bc Aa
9 Dd bc
=>
ABCa
10 Dd abc
<=
ABC
11 Dd b
=>
ABCac
12 BDd
<=
b ACac
13 d b
=>
ABCDac
14 d bc
<=
ABCDa
15 d -
=>
ABCDabc
16 cd
<=
- ABCDab
17 - -
=>
ABCDabcd

Friday, November 14, 2014

A Struggle For Survival

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"There are only two planets in this solar system that would offer a chance of survival to a Gxz," the geoanthropologist told the commander of the starship after having examined the data from the probe. "They are the sixth one from the sun and the eight one towards the sun."

The commander turned towards the astronavigator. "Current position?"

The navigator moved his tentacles quickly on the keyboard, "We are approaching one of the three orbits that are between the two mentioned by the anthropologist; the most internal one of the three, to be precise."

"What is this planet like," the commander asked.

"Uninhabitable," replied the geoantropologist. "The atmosphere is full of lethal gases such as oxygen. Gravity is moderate, and there's bucketloads of a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen without any silicon whatsoever; just thinking about it makes my verrucas crawl!"

"How many planets in this solar system?" asked the commander.

"Less than 12," the astrophysicist replied, peering at the instruments. "The exact number is..."

That's the end of the commander's log, found within the wreckage of the starship, and painstakingly translated. How many planets did that solar system contain?

a solar system

A Struggle For Survival Puzzle Solution

The answer is nine planets. The geoanthropologist states that one of the habitable planets is eighth toward the sun, so there must be at least 8 planets. The navigator mentions that there are 3 planets between the 6th planet and the 8th towards the sun. The only number that can satisfy both statements is the number nine. You will then realise that the navigator was talking about Earth.

Monday, December 16, 2013

First Jigsaw Puzzle Ever Created

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John Spilsbury was born in 1739 and he is considered the inventor of jigsaw puzzles. John Spilsbury worked as an engraver and mapmaker. He served as an apprentice to Thomas Jefferys, the Royal Geographer to King George III.
He invented the first jigsaw in 1767 and it was a map of the world. John Spilsbury attached a map to a piece of wood and then cut out each country. Teachers used Spilsbury's puzzles to teach geography.
Spilsbury Puzzle

Students learned their geography lessons by putting the world maps back together. Sensing a business opportunity, he created puzzles on eight themes - the World, Europe, Asia, Africa, America, England and Wales, Ireland and Scotland.
Geography puzzles

John Spilsbury died on 3 April 1769 leaving us the legacy of jigsaw puzzles, which are used nowadays by people in the whole world.
Online Jigsaw Puzzles



Friday, September 13, 2013

Interesting Facts on Puzzles History

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  • “Legpuzzel” is the dutch name for jigsaw puzzles and tangram-like puzzles.
  • Puzzel represents the most general word, encompassing logical puzzles, crosswords, mechanical puzzles and in general all kind of “problems” to solve.
  • On 18 october 1817 in Paris a booklet with the title “Le Casse-tĂȘte Chinois” was published and it was a copy of the English publication ” The Chinese Puzzle”.
  • In italy the etimology of word puzzles weas reflected in Rompicapo- Al Gioco Cinese chiamato il Rompi-Capo” was the title of an 1818 Italian publication.
  • The Spanish Rompecabezas is from some later date, probably introduced as Rompe-Cabezas as one of the titles of French export puzzles.
  • The German name Kopfzerbrecher has been used in 1891 as the name for the Anker tangram puzzle
  • “Chinese puzzles” became in the middle of nineteenth century the name for mechanical puzzles from Asia  - they were made in Japan or India.
  • Unlike word or jigsaw puzzles, mechanical puzzles are hand-held objects that must be manipulated to achieve a specific goal. These puzzles are often referred to as mechanical puzzles, brain teasers, 3D puzzles, mind benders, one person games, or just plain wooden games or wooden toys.